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Marketing and Communication Pills / The Story of the Two Lumberjacks or the analysis of the competition and the change of course

Marketing and Communication Pills

The Story of the two Lumberjacks or the analysis of the competition and the change of course.

This is another story that came to my email and I really liked it, that’s why I pass it on to you. It is highly applicable to the competitive world we live in today.

At the “World Lumberjack Championship” that is held every year in Canada, a Canadian and a Norwegian, named Peter and Johann respectively, reached the final. His task was very simple. Each of them was awarded a sector of the forest. Whoever cut down the most trees between 8 in the morning and 4 in the afternoon would be the winner.

At 8 o’clock the whistle sounded and the two loggers got to work deftly. They were felling, exchanging blow after blow until at ten minutes to nine the Canadian heard the Norwegian stop … Realizing his opportunity, the Canadian redoubled his efforts! At 9 o’clock, the Canadian heard the Norwegian start felling again. Once again it seemed that they were felling, exchanging blow after blow, until at ten minutes to ten the Canadian heard the Norwegian stop! The Canadian persevered, determined to make the most of his opponent’s weakness. At 10 o’clock, the Norwegian started felling again. Until ten minutes to eleven he paused again. The Canadian’s confidence was on the rise, he could “smell” the victory and continued with his regular and steady pace. And so on throughout the day. Every hour to minus ten, the Norwegian stopped and the Canadian kept felling. When the whistle blew at 4pm signaling the end of the competition, the Canadian was absolutely convinced that the award was his. You can imagine what his surprise would be when he found out that he had lost …

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“How did you do it?” he asked the Norwegian. “Every hour at least ten I heard you stop. How the hell could you cut down more trees than me? It’s not possible!” “Well, it really is very simple,” replied the Norwegian frankly. “Every hour at least ten, it would stop. And while you continued felling, I dedicated myself to sharpening the ax … “

Teaching:

How long have you stopped working to “sharpen your ax”? How long has it been since you reinforced your business knowledge to improve your management? How long has it been since you tried something different in your company, like strategically planning Communication and Marketing?

I know!… Don’t answer me, take this time to meditate! Good luck.

Now we come to the part of the story where the chain is broken. During the post-flight report, the agent informed her supervisor of what had happened Greece Email List and asked for her $ 70 taxi fare to be refunded. Instead of congratulating her on solving the case, the supervisor asked her if she had obtained a receipt for her payment. When she replied, “There was no time for that,” he actually reprimanded her: “No receipt, no refund. Be more careful next time.

Obviously, the supervisor was more interested in rigid adherence to accounting practices than in employee initiative. While fiscal responsibility is important, particularly when a cash outlay is involved, there will always be times when you need to put an asterisk on the balance sheet.

One thing is for sure: Any Virgin employee who saw the supervisor’s reaction to her colleague’s exemplary behavior would never display the same attitude as her. Which means that the customer loses and so does the entire company.

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Fortunately, the incident reached the ears of the airport manager and he quickly did what was necessary to correct the imbalance between company procedures and customer service. He alerted finance staff that he had approved the disbursement, and the supervisor received a quick reminder of how important it is at Virgin, “to catch people doing something right.”

Over time I learned about this anecdote, and it really impressed me. The next time my flight left Newark, I made sure to track down the agent who had made us feel so good. I commented, “I don’t have a taxi receipt, so she surely can’t help me.” Her astonished smile said it all.

Good customer service in business starts at the top. If your highest-ranking staff don’t understand you, even the strongest link in the line can be in trouble, as the anecdote shows.

Lastly, poor customer service can be enjoyed too… if you experience it at the hands of your competitor!

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